Extra Credit Opportunity #4

Here is another opportunity for you to earn .5 points of extra credit for J201. You are invited to participate in an study examining how people learn from news stories. Your participation in this study will involve reading a news article and answering questions about the article and various political issues.

This study can be completed online and may be taken on any computer with an Internet connection at a time and location of your convenience. We expect your participation to last less than 15 minutes. This study will be open until Sunday, March 5th at 11pm.

As with any research, your participation is voluntary, and all of the information you give will be kept confidential. If you would like to receive extra credit, but do not want to participate in the study, you may instead attend an alternate lecture on March 17th in the Nafzinger Room on the 5th floor of Vilas Hall at 6pm. Please contact ByungGu Lee, blee55@wisc.edu, for information and to RSVP.

If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact the researcher, Douglas McLeod at dmmcleod@wisc.edu. If you have any questions about your rights as a research subject, contact the Education and Social/Behavioral Science IRB at (608) 263-2320.

To participate in this study, please click on the following link: http://bit.ly/xtraCreditOpp

Thank you

Exam 1 study guide

Overview of content for exam

  •   Lecture material through week 6
  •   Material from “Required” readings through week 6
  •   Professor Graves’ guest lecture
  •   Professor Palmer’s guest lecture
  •   Professor Wagner’s guest lecture
  •   Yamiche Alcindor’s guest lecture
  • Format of exam: The exam will take place on Monday, February 27, in lecture. Arrive a few minutes early to be ready to start at 9:55. The exam will include a combination of multiple choice, fill in the blank, and short answer. Please bring a pen or two.
  • Key concepts and areas for study: This list does not include every detail you may be asked for. It is an outline of key areas and concepts. In your studying, it may be helpful to consult with peers about the details of each concept. (It also does not include all concepts from readings and guest lectures. Some concepts from readings and guest lectures are noted below; but this does not mean that others will not appear on the exam.) You are most responsible for understanding key concepts and arguments, and being able to explain them and apply them to various contexts. You will not be tested on minute details of the topics.
  •   The definition of mass media (what is a “medium”? what is “mass”?)
  •   The ‘problem’ of democracy
  •   Differences between ‘subjects’ and ‘citizens’
  •   The hybrid model of citizenship in American democracy
  •   Four fundamental functions an information system must provide in a democracy
  •   The purposes of journalism in democratic society
  •   Why the printing press was revolutionary for the distribution of information, and how it was used by Martin Luther
  •   Aeropagitica and its key arguments
  •   Printing as a business in the 1700s
  •   “Private journals,” printers and “coffeehouse culture” in the 1700s
  •   The role of the press in American independence
  •   How newspapers and the press were supported by the government after independence
  •   The partisan press: relationship between newspapers and parties; the role of both in political participation
  •   The penny press, or mass circulation press
  •   Yellow journalism
  •   The Progressive era in the United States; its concerns, emphases and consequences for journalism
  •   The muckrakers, especially Nellie Bly, Ida B. Wells, and Upton Sinclair
  •   Roles of key individuals in news organizations (publisher, reporter, etc.)
  •   Wall of separation between editorial and advertising functions
  •   Major forms of news (“straight” news, news analysis, etc.)
  •   How a printed newspaper is put together
  •   Bylines and datelines and what they tell the reader
  •   Wire services: what they are and what they do
  •   The discipline of verification
  •   The “pseudo-environment”
  •   Objectivity of the person vs. objectivity of method
  •   The principles and pitfalls of balance, false equivalency, fairness, “he said, she said” reporting, transparency
  •   Origins of false equivalence (why do journalists do it?) and implications for climate change coverage
  •   Independence from advertisers, government and politics, personal financial concerns, and sources
  •   Importance of providing context
  •   Newspapers’ role in community engagement
  •   Journalism’s “watchdog” role
  •   “press pool”
  •   White House press corps & press briefings
  •   Information subsidies
  •   Agenda setting
  •   The press’ challenge: how to allocate attention, especially in a presidential primary?

o How the press normally does this; how they did so with Trump

  •   Horserace coverage
  •   3 reasons the press covered Trump so extensively during the primaries
  •   The logic of political lying
  •   The Cold War consensus
  •   Origins of recent distrust of press (post-1960s)
  •   Nixon’s relationship with the press
  •   The political strategy of attacking the press
  •   Fragmentation and the rise of talk radio and cable news
  •   The manufacture of doubt—and its purpose
  •  Outcomes of fragmented media, distrust of press, political polarization—and consequences for democracy

Extra Credit Opportunity #3

Here is another opportunity for you to earn .5 points of extra credit for J201. You are invited to participate in an online study concerning social attitudes and behaviors in the United States. Your participation in this study will involve filling out some questionnaires as well as providing some basic demographic information. David Coppini, a doctoral student in the School of Journalism and Mass Communication is conducting this study.

In total, your participation will take approximately 25-30 minutes. This study will be open until February 27th, 2017.

If you would like to receive extra credit, but do not want to participate in the study, please send an email to David Coppini, at coppini@wisc.edu, and an alternative research presentation will be arranged.

You can participate in this study from any computer equipped with a Web browser (e.g., Google Chrome, Internet Explorer, or Mozilla Firefox) and a high speed Internet connection. You need a high-speed connection so that you can download the media content. If you do not have a high-speed connection at home, you can complete the study from a campus computer lab or library.

To participate in the online study, simply click on the following link and follow the directions: https://uwmadison.co1.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_difRiGWiwFoT8A5

If you experience any difficulties, please contact David Coppini at coppini@wisc.edu, and he will try to provide technical assistance. As with any research, your participation is voluntary, and all of the information you give will be kept strictly confidential. There are no direct benefits to participants.

Extra Credit Opportunity #2

Here’s another opportunity for you to earn .5 points of extra credit for J201. You are invited to participate in an online study concerning what people learn from reading a public health message. Douglas McLeod, Evjue Centennial professor, and graduate students in the School of Journalism and Mass Communication are conducting this study.

Your participation in this study will involve reading a public health message and answering questions about the message and various health issues. In total, we expect your participation to take less than 15 minutes. This study will be open until Sunday, February 19th at 11pm.

You can participate in this study from any computer equipped with a Web browser (e.g., Internet Explorer, Netscape, Mozilla, Firefox, Opera, or Safari) and an Internet connection. If you do not have an Internet connection at home, you can complete the study from a campus computer lab or library.

As with any research, your participation is voluntary, and all of the information you give will be kept strictly confidential. If you have questions about the project, please contact Prof. Douglas McLeod at dmmcleod@wisc.edu.

If you would like to receive extra credit, but do not want to participate in the study, you may attend an alternate lecture about the study on Friday, March 31st 1pm-2pm, Vilas 2130. Please note that you cannot receive credit for both—you will get a maximum of .5 points for participating in the study or attending the alternative lecture.

You must be at least 18 years old to participate in this study.

To participate in the online study, simply click on the following link and follow the directions: https://uwmadison.co1.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_0fhuot6Vf0NdYI5

Thank you in advance for your help with our study.

Media Analysis Essay #1

What makes for good journalism? The past two weeks, we have been considering what is most important in the practice of journalism. In media analysis essay #1, you will be applying course concepts in an evaluation of recent reporting on a major story.

Below are several stories that have developed recently. Your job is to choose one of these stories and examine how two news outlets have covered it. You can find a list of major news outlets you might choose from below. If you want to consider an outlet not in that list, check with your TA—we want to make sure students choose outlets that will make for good comparisons.

Keep in mind that a “news story” is rarely confined to a single article. Especially from large, national outlets, you are likely to see news articles, columns, editorials, letters, and possibly other content about the story. (Being smart about using searches on the relevant websites will help you identify the set of pieces that have been published on the story. You may also need to subscribe, for a short time, to the outlets to use all of their content.)

You will need to read all of these to assess the outlets’ coverage of the story.

Then you need to decide which outlet, on the whole, covered the story better. This means considering the many purposes and practices of journalism, which we have been learning about in lecture and readings, from the general functions of journalism in a democratic society to specific journalistic principles outlined by news organizations (listed below). It also means keeping in mind that each individual article or column may fulfill some of those purposes more than others. Keep in mind what kind of coverage each piece you are reading is: is it a straight news report? An opinion column? A letter to the editor? How might each of these contribute to the overall quality of an outlet’s coverage?

In your essay, make your case about which outlet covered the story better. You should include some description of each outlet’s coverage, and connect what you saw to course concepts. You should also make a case for why the criteria you use to choose the better story matter—why are those particular course concepts important to you? Put another way, what elements are most important in making good news?

Besides class concepts from lectures and required readings, you are also expected to cite at least 2 outside sources . Outside sources include further readings, guest lectures and other authoritative articles.

Your essay should be about 1500 words, uploaded to turnitin by 5:00pm on Friday, February 24. Be sure to refer to the essay guidelines found at https://201.journalism.wisc.edu/media-analysis-essays/, including an introduction paragraph that contains your thesis (and underline that thesis statement), a body including paragraphs with good topic sentences and supporting evidence, and a conclusion that sums up your essay and also considers the broader implications of what you found.

News Story Topics:

Milo Yiannopoulos’ talk canceled at University of California-Berkeley: http://www.foxnews.com/us/2017/02/01/latest-milo-yiannopoulos-berkeley-talk-canceled.html

American Special Forces raid in Yemen: http://thehill.com/policy/defense/317605-white-house-offers-timeline-on-deadly-raid-in-yemen

Implementation of Trump’s executive order on immigration halted by federal judge; appeals are in process: http://www.cnn.com/2017/02/03/politics/federal-judge-temporarily-halts-trump-travel-ban-nationwide-ag-says/

Functions and Principles of Journalism:

Functions of journalism in a democratic society  Practices of American journalism     
To inform the public

To investigate issues & problems

To offer analysis

To empathize

To be a public forum

To mobilize citizens

 

Objectivity

Balance

Fairness

Accuracy/Verification

Independence

Context

Transparency

Relevance and engagement

Holding power accountable

Major News Outlets:

  • The New York Times
  • The Washington Post
  • The Wall Street Journal
  • Los Angeles Times
  • Chicago Tribune
  • Huffington post
  • Politico
  • ABC News
  • NBC News
  • CBS News
  • CNN
  • NPR
  • Guardian
  • BBC

 

Extra Credit Opportunity #1

Here’s an opportunity for you to earn .5 points of extra credit for J201. You are invited to participate in an online study concerning what people learn from reading news editorials. Douglas McLeod, Evjue Centennial professor, and graduate students in the School of Journalism and Mass Communication are conducting this study.

In this on-line study, some questions concerning your perceptions of social and political issues will be asked through a self-report questionnaire. You will also encounter a news editorial and potentially some additional content, followed by a second questionnaire. In total, we expect your participation to take approximately 20 minutes. This study will be open until Sunday, February 12th at 11pm.

You can participate in this study from any computer equipped with a Web browser (e.g., Internet Explorer, Netscape, Mozilla, Firefox, Opera, or Safari) and an Internet connection. If you do not have an Internet connection at home, you can complete the study from a campus computer lab or library.

As with any research, your participation is voluntary, and all of the information you give will be kept strictly confidential. If you have questions about the project, please contact Prof. Douglas McLeod at dmmcleod@wisc.edu.

If you would like to receive extra credit, but do not want to participate in the study, you may attend an alternate lecture about the study on Friday, March 17th 1pm-2pm, Vilas 2130. Please note that you cannot receive credit for both—you will get a maximum of .5 points for participating in this study or attending the alternative lecture.

You must be at least 18 years old to participate in this study.

To participate in the online study, simply click on the following link and follow the directions: https://uwmadison.co1.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_6FH2GfjY2o7H1Rj

Thank you in advance for your help with our study.

Short Writing Assignment #2

In Media Analysis Essay #1, you will be analyzing news coverage and crafting an argument about what constitutes good coverage. This short writing is a warm up for that essay.

Since class began, you have been reading news to keep up with current events. For this assignment, take a moment to reflect on what you have read and how well it has been reported.

Then pick one “story” and think about how it has been covered. By one story, we don’t mean only one news article, but an event or occurrence that may be covered in a variety of ways. (For instance, when President Trump issued an executive order with new limitations on immigrants and refugees, many newspapers ran multiple news articles, over several days, and also included opinion columns, news analyses, editorials and letters that also offered coverage of the story. All of that would be the newspaper’s coverage of that one story.)

You can consider just one new outlet’s coverage, or you can think about multiple outlets’ coverage of the story. In your writing, describe at least one aspect of the coverage that has impressed you, and at least one that you think could be better. These are your opinions, of course, but you should support your claims with reference to ideas from class. Recent lectures on purposes and practices of journalism, and readings such as the Kovach & Rosenstiel, are likely to be most helpful.

Remember: this assignment is not about whether you approve of the events being described (for example, whether you are for or against Trump’s executive order), but about your assessment of the work of journalists to communicate those policies to the public.

In terms of citations: as in short assignment #1, here we are not very concerned about formal citations. However, you should use your words to acknowledge where your materials and ideas are coming from, when they are not wholly your own. To cite a news article you want to discuss, you might say, “I read an article by John Smith in the Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel titled ‘The Budget Problem.’” To cite the Kovach and Rosenstiel chapter, you could simply say, “As Kovach and Rosenstiel describe …”

Your writing should be 500 words, and posted to turnitin.com by 5:00pm on Thursday, February 9.